Friday, August 25, 2006

The prefect Steorn

Free energy from magnetic fields? Unless Steorn is talking of somehow harvesting energy from ley lines, they are probably talking about using a combination of magnetic and kinetic energy converted into electrical energy...
which is exactly what a wind turbine does.

Given the similarity of the name "storm" and "steorn" is quite possible that they have created a highly efficent wind turbine (at least in the small scale).

Imagine a little fan in your mobile phone which gets charged up as you talk on it? Imagine if the Toyota Prius had a little wind turbine to help charge the battery up that little bit more?

Why aren't they used... well the payoff of energy collected isn't worth it. As somone who wonders why there isn't a little fan on the top of street lamps to power them up over the day, I think it's a nice idea.

Silly me, eh? It's as likely as me getting to the next round of that show.

take care,
Will

2 Comments:

Blogger blogtrotter said...

Funny how everytime I seek something strange like Steorn on the web the Irish hits are full of ignorant pseudo sceptics slagging their fellow countrymen - sick and makes me ashamed to be Irish - a nation of back-biters!

So they seem to have put their money where their mouth is, in a big way. Also, they spent 2 years ‘ testing the hell out of the thing’, and as they are competent engineers and mention a full thermodynamic analysis etc., one presumes they covered aspects such as run down of magnet strength. They say that after this careful testing they took their test rig to universities and though most refused to have anything to do with it, some tested and found it OK. Why would they lie about that if they were putting their money on the line? So it sounds better and better the more I hear. I can’t wait for the Jury to cry out ‘douze points’.

On the theory that they will sucker in investors while the jury is deliberating: McCarthy said that precisely to scotch that idea they are refusing all commercialisation until the jury pronounces.

As to the form of the energy gain – it seems it is purely mechanical – which is why they will need some means to convert to electricity.

Look around their web site and you see in the News section that they have been working with DIT (Dublin Institute of Technology ) in awarding students prizes. They are actually based on the tech centre in Dublin’s fashionable docklands (houses going for millions Euros there now). As a former Dublin resident I know DIT as an old 3rd level institute. It used to be Bolton Street tech. college (& maybe others who joined them). So the firm is legit and not just an Australian call-box or MS logo hoax. There seems to be more meat on this than on the standard claims to extract energy from the vacuum. For this is the claim here – free doesn’t mean ex-nihilo, but from an unknown source. I liked the idea that it might be harnessing fluxes in the vacuum like a windmill harness air fluxes.:

On the idea that the way to do things is to get peer reviewed papers published in respectable scientific journal: McCarthy made it plain that there are 2 or 3 paths to follow – the first is that of peer review, which is a slow and painful process over 20 years or so – look at e.g. Blacklight power and hydrinos – they are now getting peer reviewed physics, chemistry and engineering papers published and attracting comments from scientists that are being publicised. But that has taken about 10 years (or more – mills started almost 20 years ago) and there is still lack of agreement on the meaning of their results.

Next path is make a heater or a car powered on the process – this again is a long affair, and you first need the patents! That takes ages, and then to actually get a commercially viable product takes years – again taking Blacklight as an example, they have been promising a heater for 5 years or so and it seems no nearer completion. Maybe their plasma cells are hard to control. But so will the magnetic motors of Steorn: these are all complex systems. As McCarthy said on the interview – they know in principle what is the optimum configuration to get power out: the only problem is in getting the alignment accurate enough etc. Remember these are still lab bench versions – the first crude prototypes. Later, when finely machined, they would presumably be deterministically reproducible.

So the way Steorn is going may be the fastest after all – get verification by jury of cynical experts: this in a sense is a turbo peer review. Well, wait and see – he asks us not to believe him at this point – so until the jury comes out, the jury is out!

One other thing – at least Steorn don’t wheel out a weird and controversial physical theory, as Blacklight did. The latter only succeeded in getting people’s backs up and delivering ammunition to their critics. If they had just kept their iconoclastic theory to themselves and allowed the experiments to speak for themselves, then they would be a lot further than they are now.


God be with the days of steam! It was all so simple then. The great thing about it was billowing clouds of the stuff were a great indicator that energy was in use. Steorn have actually shown their setup working to the Guardian reporter who visited their site. But all there was to see were displays saying that more energy was coming out than going in. In a complex magneto-mechanical setup you may need to slap on measurement devices to show what’s going on. That’s why they say they need experts to give it a clean bill of health. But apparently you’re fine poo-poo-ing it now, as Steorn wants people only to believe it if or when the cynical jurors have given it the thumbs up.

Check out he Steorn song at www.steornwatch.com -
great song - captures the spirit of the age. Every heroic campaign needs its ballads and this could be the first in a titanic struggle against big power cartels, prejudice or whatever. Assuming this is the right stuff, that is. And Sean & co. give ever more the impression of believing what they are doing is real. So either they are deluded, heroes, or part of some colossal stunt or joke. The latter possibilities seem less and less likely, so roll on ye troubadours!

[QUOTE=Nigel Goodwin]I was under the impression, from his own website, that they had attracted substantial investment?.

In any case, this still doesn't get over the fact that he still hasn't ever produced a working machine!.[/QUOTE]

I was under the impression that the investment went back into the earlier phase, when they were doing initial wok on new technology for the bank sector. They had earlier been facilitators of e-commerce for other firms, but after the dot-gone episode they took a tumble, with layoffs, and had to concentrate on what they were getting a reputation for - i.e. hardware/software solutions to security issues, where they were known for leading edge technology. The investors, on the strength of this, gave them a budget of a few million with 3 or so years to come up with improved battery efficiency for things like ATMs or the associated CCTV cameras. It was in the course of that work that they stumbled on the magnetic anomalies they claim give free energy. Thus in a sense they are out on a limb: spending that budget on a rather risky offshoot of their brief. But that's what blue-sky research is about - serendipity is welcome with venture capitalists...

As to why no machine - as McCarthy explained until he was blue in the face, they are a technology initiator firm, with no plant for product production. They intend to farm out the manufacture of ‘application devices’. Their brief is always proof of concept. Why should they go to the trouble of learning new skills and buying expensive equipment if at the end sceptics query where the hidden power lead is? That would then lead to an investigation of the same scope as the one now underway. So, clever businessmen that they are, they realised they could cut out that trouble and go straight to the investigation with what hey have now – just invest the effort in making 12 copies of the test rig for the 12 jury members.

Impeccable logic – unlike some less than Vulcan posters here!


I found it one of the coolest thing s in first year physics – how easy it was to show that a magnetic field is how an electric field appears to someone moving at a constant velocity relative to the electric field – or vice versa. Faraday’s law proven easily… lets see if can find it on wikipedia: well, here, for starters, is the basics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field#Lorentz_force_on_wire_segment



Those reasons of course are alarmist. Off top of my head -

(1) Oil and gas would only gradually phase out. It would take years to implement the Steorn system, in which time oil and gas companies will buy into the production of the devices. There will be a huge industry to maintain the devices, which will run down as bearing erode etc. So I see the old oilists entering that and related markets.

(2) Car industry need not fear, as McCarhty said - they will cheerfully fix in the new motors and make a killing selling the latest models and re-tooling old ones. They need not give a damn about what runs the car – we see that with solar and hybrid now. A car is a car, and new models will always entice the ego-driven males and females.

(3) Just as with solar, the new jobs created will offset any lost. Maybe even more will be created. In particular, a huge industry would spring up to decommission nuke stations – the nuke industry would be absorbed into that for 20 years or more.

Etc. – for every caveat there’s a benefit…

5:29 p.m., September 10, 2006  
Blogger blogtrotter said...

So they seem to have put their money where their mouth is, in a big way. Also, they spent 2 years ‘ testing the hell out of the thing’, and as they are competent engineers and mention a full thermodynamic analysis etc., one presumes they covered aspects such as run down of magnet strength. They say that after this careful testing they took their test rig to universities and though most refused to have anything to do with it, some tested and found it OK. Why would they lie about that if they were putting their money on the line? So it sounds better and better the more I hear. I can’t wait for the Jury to cry out ‘douze points’.

On the theory that they will sucker in investors while the jury is deliberating: McCarthy said that precisely to scotch that idea they are refusing all commercialisation until the jury pronounces.

As to the form of the energy gain – it seems it is purely mechanical – which is why they will need some means to convert to electricity.

Look around their web site and you see in the News section that they have been working with DIT (Dublin Institute of Technology ) in awarding students prizes. They are actually based on the tech centre in Dublin’s fashionable docklands (houses going for millions Euros there now). As a former Dublin resident I know DIT as an old 3rd level institute. It used to be Bolton Street tech. college (& maybe others who joined them). So the firm is legit and not just an Australian call-box or MS logo hoax. There seems to be more meat on this than on the standard claims to extract energy from the vacuum. For this is the claim here – free doesn’t mean ex-nihilo, but from an unknown source. I liked the idea that it might be harnessing fluxes in the vacuum like a windmill harness air fluxes.:

On the idea that the way to do things is to get peer reviewed papers published in respectable scientific journal: McCarthy made it plain that there are 2 or 3 paths to follow – the first is that of peer review, which is a slow and painful process over 20 years or so – look at e.g. Blacklight power and hydrinos – they are now getting peer reviewed physics, chemistry and engineering papers published and attracting comments from scientists that are being publicised. But that has taken about 10 years (or more – mills started almost 20 years ago) and there is still lack of agreement on the meaning of their results.

Next path is make a heater or a car powered on the process – this again is a long affair, and you first need the patents! That takes ages, and then to actually get a commercially viable product takes years – again taking Blacklight as an example, they have been promising a heater for 5 years or so and it seems no nearer completion. Maybe their plasma cells are hard to control. But so will the magnetic motors of Steorn: these are all complex systems. As McCarthy said on the interview – they know in principle what is the optimum configuration to get power out: the only problem is in getting the alignment accurate enough etc. Remember these are still lab bench versions – the first crude prototypes. Later, when finely machined, they would presumably be deterministically reproducible.

So the way Steorn is going may be the fastest after all – get verification by jury of cynical experts: this in a sense is a turbo peer review. Well, wait and see – he asks us not to believe him at this point – so until the jury comes out, the jury is out!

One other thing – at least Steorn don’t wheel out a weird and controversial physical theory, as Blacklight did. The latter only succeeded in getting people’s backs up and delivering ammunition to their critics. If they had just kept their iconoclastic theory to themselves and allowed the experiments to speak for themselves, then they would be a lot further than they are now.


God be with the days of steam! It was all so simple then. The great thing about it was billowing clouds of the stuff were a great indicator that energy was in use. Steorn have actually shown their setup working to the Guardian reporter who visited their site. But all there was to see were displays saying that more energy was coming out than going in. In a complex magneto-mechanical setup you may need to slap on measurement devices to show what’s going on. That’s why they say they need experts to give it a clean bill of health. But apparently you’re fine poo-poo-ing it now, as Steorn wants people only to believe it if or when the cynical jurors have given it the thumbs up.

Check out he Steorn song at www.steornwatch.com -
great song - captures the spirit of the age. Every heroic campaign needs its ballads and this could be the first in a titanic struggle against big power cartels, prejudice or whatever. Assuming this is the right stuff, that is. And Sean & co. give ever more the impression of believing what they are doing is real. So either they are deluded, heroes, or part of some colossal stunt or joke. The latter possibilities seem less and less likely, so roll on ye troubadours!

[QUOTE=Nigel Goodwin]I was under the impression, from his own website, that they had attracted substantial investment?.

In any case, this still doesn't get over the fact that he still hasn't ever produced a working machine!.[/QUOTE]

I was under the impression that the investment went back into the earlier phase, when they were doing initial wok on new technology for the bank sector. They had earlier been facilitators of e-commerce for other firms, but after the dot-gone episode they took a tumble, with layoffs, and had to concentrate on what they were getting a reputation for - i.e. hardware/software solutions to security issues, where they were known for leading edge technology. The investors, on the strength of this, gave them a budget of a few million with 3 or so years to come up with improved battery efficiency for things like ATMs or the associated CCTV cameras. It was in the course of that work that they stumbled on the magnetic anomalies they claim give free energy. Thus in a sense they are out on a limb: spending that budget on a rather risky offshoot of their brief. But that's what blue-sky research is about - serendipity is welcome with venture capitalists...

As to why no machine - as McCarthy explained until he was blue in the face, they are a technology initiator firm, with no plant for product production. They intend to farm out the manufacture of ‘application devices’. Their brief is always proof of concept. Why should they go to the trouble of learning new skills and buying expensive equipment if at the end sceptics query where the hidden power lead is? That would then lead to an investigation of the same scope as the one now underway. So, clever businessmen that they are, they realised they could cut out that trouble and go straight to the investigation with what hey have now – just invest the effort in making 12 copies of the test rig for the 12 jury members.

Impeccable logic – unlike some less than Vulcan posters here!


I found it one of the coolest thing s in first year physics – how easy it was to show that a magnetic field is how an electric field appears to someone moving at a constant velocity relative to the electric field – or vice versa. Faraday’s law proven easily… lets see if can find it on wikipedia: well, here, for starters, is the basics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field#Lorentz_force_on_wire_segment



Those reasons of course are alarmist. Off top of my head -

(1) Oil and gas would only gradually phase out. It would take years to implement the Steorn system, in which time oil and gas companies will buy into the production of the devices. There will be a huge industry to maintain the devices, which will run down as bearing erode etc. So I see the old oilists entering that and related markets.

(2) Car industry need not fear, as McCarhty said - they will cheerfully fix in the new motors and make a killing selling the latest models and re-tooling old ones. They need not give a damn about what runs the car – we see that with solar and hybrid now. A car is a car, and new models will always entice the ego-driven males and females.

(3) Just as with solar, the new jobs created will offset any lost. Maybe even more will be created. In particular, a huge industry would spring up to decommission nuke stations – the nuke industry would be absorbed into that for 20 years or more.

Etc. – for every caveat there’s a benefit…

5:30 p.m., September 10, 2006  

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